Editor's gathering for thread electropoetics

Gathering: Editor's gathering for thread electropoetics

For many who are committed to working in electronic environments, an electronic “review” might better be named a “retrospective,” a mere scholarly commemoration of a phenomenon that is passing. There’s a technological subtext to the declining prestige of authors and literary canons. To bring that subtext to the surface will be part of ebr’s agenda.

Collected by: 
Publication date: 
2005-07-26

Kaye in Wonderland

2003-03-20

Komninos Zervos reviews the Hayles/Burdick collaboration, Writing Machines (2003), and reengages the cyberdebates (initiated in Y2K).

Evangelizing the Everyday Web

2003-03-20

Scott Rettberg appreciates Weinberg’s small pieces more than his ‘unified theory,’ while viewing the Internet not as an economic panacea but a communication medium woven into the fabric of contemporary culture.

Bridge Work

2003-03-25

Form and platform are bridged in Stephanie Strickland’s “V: WaveSon.nets/Losing L’una,” a book with two beginings and a website to boot. Chris Funkhouser tests the load limit of this innovative, precarious structure.

Justin Hall and the Birth of the 'Blogs

2003-03-25

Rob Wittig looks at one of the earliest “Weblogs,” and finds there a persisting model for serial e-fiction and an interaction no less compelling than the literary correspondence between Henry Miller and Anais Nin.

A User's Guide to the New Millennium

2003-03-26

Over 800 pages, the New Media Reader does not exhaust its subject; it even sets the stage for a companion volume.

The Materiality of Technotexts

2003-03-27

A book about books conscious of their materiality, N. Katherine Hayles’ Writing Machines draws praise from Raine Koskimaa for its own media consciousness, and blame for embodied emphasis.

New Media Studies

2003-03-28

Scott Rettberg introduces ‘New Media Studies’: a cluster of reviews, and a term (similar in its emergence to the term ‘Postmodernism’).