Tag: ai

Phoebe Sengers responds


Phoebe Sengers praises the optimistic, self-aware conversation mapped by Warren Sack and First Person.

Michael Mateas responds


As alternatives to agency-obsession, “critical technical practices” that connect art and technology are front and center in the work of Michael Mateas.

Michael Mateas responds in turn


Narrativists vs. ludologists, material vs. formal constraints: Michael Mateas replies by identifying actors’ roles in each division.

Natalie Jeremijenko responds in turn


Natalie Jeremijenko asserts that machine speech should re-awaken us to “the peculiar structure of participation that we take for granted.”

A Preliminary Poetics


The builder of Façade, an “interactive story world,” Michael Mateas offers both a poetics and a neo-Aristotelian project (for interactive drama and games).

Phoebe Sengers responds in turn


Whether CTPs should walk on three legs or two; how the robotic artwork Petit Mal is “interpretationally plastic;” what cultural assumptions we build into machines: just some of the response-topics here.

Warren Sack's response


Warren Sack sheds some psychosocial light on readings, like Jill Walker’s, of the uncanny.

Simon Penny's response


Simon Penny adds object-context to the talking machines of Natalie Jeremijenko’s essay.

Warren Sack responds in turn


An autobiographical reflection by Warren Sack, prompted by two particular questions.

Anti-Negroponte: Cybernetic Subjectivity in Digital Being and Time


Timothy Luke reviews Nicholas Negroponte and takes a second look at ‘digital subjectivity.’