Tag: cybertext

Interactive Fiction


Which alias best fits interactive fiction?
The nominees are:
“Story,” “Game,” “Storygame,” “Novel,” “World,”
“Literature,” “Puzzle,” “Problem,” “Riddle,” and “Machine.”
Read, and decide.

The Pleasures of Immersion and Interaction


J. Yellowlees Douglas and Andrew Hargadon on the affective side of hypertexts via “schemas, scripts, and the fifth business.”

Towards Computer Game Studies


Literature scholars eager to understand gaming have made early inroads. Markku Eskelinen sets up serious checkpoints.

Materiality and Matter and Stuff: What Electronic Texts Are Made Of


Following Katherine Hayles, Matthew Kirschenbaum agrees that materiality matters.

Hypertexts and Interactives


The parallels (and oppositions) between hypertext and AI are brought out in section five.

Henry Jenkins responds in turn


Casting the ludology vs. narratology debate as a game in itself, Henry Jenkins brings Bible gardens and the duck-billed platypus into this defense of hybridity.

Markku Eskelinen's response


Even orienteering is of greater use to game designers than narratology, claims Marrku Eskelinen, heading towards an area free from stories once more.



First Person, second section: What is Ludology? Editors Pat Harrigan and Noah Wardrip-Fruin see a disciplinary shift away from ill-advised analogies toward analyses of the gaming situation itself.

Positioning Hypertext in Chomsky's Hierarchy of Grammars


Jim Rosenberg sends a shot of grammar straight across the bow of Nick Montfort’s controversial Cybertext review, adding volume to a volley already in progress

The Materiality of Technotexts


A book about books conscious of their materiality, N. Katherine Hayles’ Writing Machines draws praise from Raine Koskimaa for its own media consciousness, and blame for embodied emphasis.