Tag: games

Pasts and Futures of Netprov


In Pasts and Futures of Netprov, Rob Wittig articlates a theory for Networked Improv Narratives, or “Netprovs.” Wittig, an innovator in this novel form, situates netprov at the interesection of literature, drama, mass media, games, and new media. Transcribed from a presentation given at the Electronic Literature Organization conference in Morgantown, WV, Wittig explores a number of antecedents to the form, documents current exemplars of this practice, and invites readers to create their own networked improvisations.

Jon McKenzie's response (excerpt)


An appreciative reply that measures the incline of Henry Jenkins’ middle ground.

Mizuko Ito's response (excerpt)


Asymmetries between event time and play time interest Mizuko Ito, who asks “How do you answer the door to get a pizza to nourish your flesh-and-blood body when you are in the middle of life and death online combat?”

Richard Schechner's response (excerpt)


Richard Schechner remembers the real-life side of interaction.

Genre Trouble


“Where is the text in chess?” asks Espen Aarseth. Rules, play, and semiosis are the (un)common ground between games and stories in “interactive narrativism” and the art of simulation.

Mizuko Ito's response (excerpt)


Mizuko Ito recounts her experience at an unusual gaming convention in Japan, and posits fan culture as a way to understand software.

Academic Intent


Mark Barret cautions against reinventing the wheel in this riposte to Cyberdrama and to Janet Murray’s essay.

Emotion Engine, Take 2. Jeff Tidball Responds to the Second Person Collection as a Whole


Jeff Tidball contends that the Second Person collection deals too much with the mechanics of narrative and too little with the emotion it can evoke.

From the Basement to the Basic Set: The Early Years of Dungeons & Dragons


Erik Mona takes a first step toward measuring the cultural impact of Gygax and Arneson’s Dungeons & Dragons by providing a pocket history of the game’s generation and evolution. Mona explains the addition of character development as a game goal - the innovation that distinguishes D&D from its predecessors, and started the role-playing revolution.

Markku Eskelinen's response to Julian Raul Kucklich


Markku Eskelinen reiterates the bounds of ludology.