Tag: Katherine Hayles

Notes Toward a Proleptic History of Electronic Reading


Matthew Kirschenbaum rethinks the final section of First Person in light of “five basic strategies for furthering the history of reading.”

Moving Through Me as I Move


Techno-poet Stephanie Strickland surveys the digital artistic practices of her peers and presents a “paradigm for interaction.”

How to Think (with) Thinkertoys: Electronic Literature Collection, Volume 1


Adalaide Morris considers ‘tutor texts’ in the Electronic Literature Collection and, in doing so, articulates a poetics for the emerging field of e-lit. Instead of fulfilling Ted Nelson’s dream of ‘computer lib,’ the most compelling entries in the Collection emphasize the continuing necessity of writing under constraint. When the revolution
turns out to be, not a liberation from a culture of control but its
transformation, practices long familiar to experimental poets in print become generalized throughout new media and their panoply of

The Cheshire Cat's Grin


Diana Lobb responds to Katherine Hayles and ponders the ambiguities of dialogue.

The Emperor's New Clothes


Diana Lobb tackles the legacy of positivism and the politics of chaotics.

New Readings


The reader steps to the fore in the final section of First Person, reconfigured and ready for interaction.

Unusual Positions


Camille Utterback exposits “embodied interaction with symbolic spaces” - the body and language of digital art.

Simon Penny responds in turn


Simon Penny recalls that the origins of the human-computer interface, politicized by a military heritage, are now explored by artist-enigineers who chaperone fragmentation and dissent.

What Remains in Liam's Going


Pattern, absence, routine, return - Dave Ciccoricco mulls the shape(s) in Michael Joyce’s new paper novel, Liam’s Going

Virtuality and VRML: Software Studies After Manovich


A call for (and example of) material studies of software from Matt Kirschenbaum, spurred by the Digital Arts and Culture conference, 2000.