Tag: postmodernism

Practicing Disappearance: A Postmodern Methodology

2016-12-04

In this essay, Neil Vallelly answers the question “What is postmodernism?” by demonstrating how disappearance, as envisaged by Jean Baudrillard, “lies at the heart of postmodern theory.” Vallelly also argues for the critical value of postmodernism’s traces in contemporary literature and suggests the adoption of a “methodology that embraces disappearance.”

What is Metamodernism and Why Bother? Meditations on Metamodernism as a Period Term and as a Mode

2016-12-04

Alexandra Dumitrescu’s essay describes the development of metamodernism in New Zealand and presents metamodernism as an interrogation of “modernist uprootedness or postmodern drifting”.

From Master(y) Narratives to Matter Narratives: Jeanette Winterson’s The Stone Gods

2016-12-04

In an attempt to re-materialize postmodernism, Damien Gibson provides, by drawing on material ecocriticism and on the concept of “narrative agency”, a critical posthumanist reading of Jeanette Winterson’s The Stone Gods.

The historical status of postmodernism under neoliberalism

2016-12-04

Simon During proposes to unravel the “layered” history of postmodernism in New Zealand. In so doing, the author of this essay treats postmodernism as “an event rather than a period” and describes postmodernism’s development in the epoch of neo-liberalism.

"Not Going Where I Was Knowing”: Time and Direction in the Postmodernism of Gertrude Stein and Caroline Bergvall

2016-12-04

In an essay spanning modernist and postmodernist poetics, Lynley Edmeades demonstrates how postmodern poetry cultivates “present-ness” by drawing on Lyotard’s concept of “constancy”, Gertrude Stein’s notion of “continuous present” and Caroline Bergvall’s adherence to “non-linearity.”

Nominalisms Ancient and Modern: Samuel Beckett, the Pre/Post/Modernist?

2016-12-04

While describing the work of Beckett as deeply influenced by nominalism, Holy Philipps explores “ineffable permutations of intellectual history” and demonstrates how medieval philosophy has deeply influenced twentieth century literature. Simultaneously, Philipps undermines the idea that nominalism’s dismantlement of universals has finally been accomplished by postmodernism.

The Uses of Postmodernism

2016-12-04

In this cross-cultural treatment of the ‘uses’ of postmodernism, Jacob Edmond adopts a transnational perspective to critically access the concept of “postmodernism”. Edmond describes the development of postmodernism in the USA, Europe, New Zealand, Russia, and China and demonstrates how, even if considered as an imprecise term, “postmodernism” came to represent cultural and historical changes that took place in the late 20th century.

And the Last Shall Be the First

2013-07-08

Ralph Clare sees the new essay collection on William Gaddis as engaging a growing reassessment of the novelist’s work. Taking up the task of moving the scholarship past the postmodern theories that framed and determined it for some time, Clare argues that ‘The Last of Something’ turns out to be the beginning of something more. Approaches in the collection range from new forms of biographical and contextual criticism, to theories of data storage and “bare life,” but the nuance and ambition of the scholarship re-asserts the relevance of Gaddis.

The Latest Word

2012-04-14

Can a corporate-dominated Web become an environment conducive to literary activity? The novelist, essayist, and cultural critic Curtis White is skeptical. Responding to criticisms of his account of the devolution of literary publishing and reflecting on the prevalence of market-driven values in online exchanges, White doubts whether literature can distinguish itself in the noisy new media ecology, which he likens to a high-tech prison house.

Looking for Writing after Postmodernism

2012-06-28

House of Leaves may be on everyone’s shortlist of postmodern media-savvy novels, but are we ready for a retrospective collection of essays on Mark Z. Danielewski? According to Daniel Punday’s review, Joe Bray and Alison Gibbons’ collection says as much about the current state of (post) postmodernist writing as it does about Danielewski’s scant oeuvre.

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